Hot Pink Lindsays, the pinkest socks ever

During the Summer of Socks (parts 1, 2, & 3!) last year, I ordered a variety pack of Knit Picks Hawthorne in order to get a certain specific color that I wanted that wasn’t available individually for some weird reason, and I ended up with a bunch of random colors of sock yarn that I might not have necessarily bought otherwise.

20170725_103154

It’s hard to go wrong with a variety pack of Hawthorne, though, since all of the colors are just super-saturated and gorgeous, and these jewel tones were right up my alley.

But that pink! It’s so pink that I kept saying it “pank” over and over again. This color is called “Rose City,” and it is the pinkest yarn I have ever seen, and I have knit an awful lot of Pussyhats. It’s a glorious thing, but not something that I feel like I’d ever be able to wear, even on my feet. I’m just not that committed to pink.

However, after some of my coworkers at the hospital saw my socks from the Summer of Socks (yes, I will refer to it with its full name every time), I got requests for hand-knitted socks from all kinds of people. When my friend Sabrina said that she wanted some, I knew that this pink would be perfect for her.

20180124_114458

Sabrina is a kick-ass punk-rock pixie-looking awesome nurse that I had the pleasure of working with while our floor was being renovated almost 2 years ago. She’s all black hair and cool tattoos and sassiness, and this pink just called out to me when she expressed an interest in some socks.

I sat down with her and showed her a bunch of sock patterns, and she picked out Lindsay by Cookie A., a masterpiece of garter-stitch short-rowing and gathered stitches.

20180124_114506

Now, I am beyond pleased with the way these came out. They are exactly like I pictured in my mind, and I think that the pink just works amazingly well here.

However…

20180101_105412

…those k4togs are a bitch. If you are a long-time reader of this blog, you know that I have a long-standing hatred of all things nupp, bobble, and popcorn stitch. Knitting 4 stitches together with any sort of legit tension on the yarn is just a goddamn nightmare.

20180124_114650

But, dang it if they don’t look real pretty when they’re done.  I guess it’s worth it when it looks so good.

In order to complete these, I had to thread the needle through all 4 stitches, and then work the needle back and forth over and over again to open up the space inside the stitches before wrapping the yarn. Otherwise, if I tried to pull the working yarn though, everything slipped off the needle in a big mess, and a great deal of swearing would occur.

20180103_231221

As for the other design features, I was so enamored of the short row garter-stitch heels that I took a picture and bragged all over Facebook about them to people who had no idea what I was so jazzed about. Which is pretty much business as usual, to be honest.

20180124_114541

I might be a complete short row heel convert now.

20180124_114628

And the toes! So stretchy and comfy and stylish. The seam ends up landing sort of in the crease where your toes meet your foot, but you really can’t feel anything there. When you’re knitting them, they look a little bulbous and strange, but when they’re done, they stretch and fit perfectly.

20180124_114927

Lastly, these socks are paired symmetrically, which I feel is something that I don’t see nearly enough of in knitwear.

20180124_114725

Each sock has a column of knit stitches that run up the outside edge, and I just find this so aesthetically pleasing. Cookie A. is all about these wonderful details, and that’s probably why I’ve made so many of her socks. (Kai-Mei, Cauchy, Sam, Mingus, Stricken, Pomatomus, and Hedera, to be exact.)

20180124_114910

So pretty and so pank. Sabrina sent me a picture of her wearing them the day after she got them, so I’m happy that crazy hot pink yarn found a good home. There was a nupp-like struggle to overcome, but it was all clearly meant to be. It’s nice when things work out that way.

Advertisements

Showered with Love – the Moderne Baby Blanket

“The people you work with are people you were just thrown together with. You know, you don’t know them, it wasn’t your choice, and yet you spend more time with them then you do your friends or your family. But probably all you’ve got in common is the fact that you walk around on the same bit of carpet for 8 hours a day. And so, obviously, when someone comes in who you… you have a connection with… yeah.” – Tim Canterbury, The Office

20160226_102304

Now, I know that quote up there is about a man finding the love of his life, but really, I think it applies for all of those wonderful work relationships that everyone experiences, but are hard to describe.

There are people who you would have otherwise never would have met, and once you’re put together with them, particularly in the stressful field in which I work, find it very difficult to imagine your work, hell, your life without them.

My lovely friend Christina is one of these people.

20160226_102100

I knew from the day that we met, in a class where we had to qualify for our PALS certification (that’s right, I’m all kinds of responsible for the lives of children now, it’s crazy), that she was going to be one of the people that made my new job a good place to be. We work night shift together on the 6th floor, where we take care of lots of different high-acuity patients, children with brain injuries, kidney diseases, and heart defects, and even though it’s night shift, it can be extremely hectic and demanding, due to how much care our kids need and how busy our hospital is.

20160226_102353

Christina is always there for me to bond with over our shared pediatrics experience. She’s kind to a fault, knowing exactly the right way to talk to children and parents to put them at ease, and I know several kids that we see frequently who ask for her to be their nurse every time they come. Even when she’s got a ridiculous amount to accomplish in a shift, she’s always got a smile for anyone who comes up to her. She is always down to help with any small task or enormous disaster (usually involving inordinate amounts of bodily fluids) that occurs, no matter what.

20160226_102141

When Christina found herself suddenly, and really unexpectedly, about to have a baby, I knew that I had to make her something to show her how much I appreciate having her in my life, no matter how randomly we were brought together (and also because I feel like love is best shown through gestures like these, not just how we sit off to the side of the nurses’ station and talk about our pets).

20160226_102325

She and her boyfriend didn’t want to find out whether the baby is a boy or a girl ahead of time, so I figured that the silly amount of yarn I had left over from Squares and Squares and Squares would be best served in making a green-and-brown woodsy, squishy blanket for a teeny, tiny baby-to-be that will be very much loved by his or her entire adopted nursing family.

20160226_102238

Time to talk shop. The pattern here is the Moderne Baby Blanket by the glorious ladies behind Mason-Dixon Knitting, baby cousin to the Modern Log Cabin Blanket, which I made in 2009 with Elsbeth Lavold Silky Wool and remains a prized possession in my home, only allowed to be used in my office where there are no cats allowed. I can’t blame them, that squishy garter stitch is really, really tempting to stick your claws in and get in some good kneading.

Wanna see that one?

2009-10-31 028

Hell yeah, that’s a big blanket.

This Modern Baby Blanket is quite a bit smaller, and full of little tweaks to accommodate the fact that I was using yarn from another project. First things first, I was dealing with seven colors here, as opposed to four, so I had to be strategic about not letting colors that were too similar stack up on each other, as well as constantly checking to make sure that I was using up each color as much as possible, judging each new rectangle by its placement and what size it would be before choosing which color to go with next.

20160226_102221

That sounds so much more complicated than it actually was.

Go ahead and click on the link for Squares and Squares and Squares above in order to see which colors of Knit Picks Brava Worsted I used (it’s all of them except for Mulberry), in case you want to make your own. The only other thing that I changed was the size of the blocks around the outside edges. Because I was using the leftovers from another large blanket, all I had to work with was slightly less than a skein of each color. Because of this, I worked with each color as long as I possibly could, and then recalculated how many stitches to pick up on the subsequent crossing blocks.

20160226_102513

Again, that sounds way more complicated that it was. Part of what’s wonderful about this pattern is how easy it is to customize. I’ve seen fantastic adaptations where people make long gradients of one color family, where they knit in extra borders between blocks, where they go crazy with multicolored yarn…it’s all awesome.

The Brava makes for a wonderfully squishy, hefty knit, perfect for softening up a floor to let a baby hang out and get some tummy time, while also being really easy to wash and care for.

20160302_180116

After finishing up, this precious bundle made its way to a super-stylish baby shower (Seriously, look at all that gray and green! I want to redecorate my house to look like this future baby’s possessions now.), in our conference room on our hospital floor, because sometimes work can wait while people eat fruit tarts and open presents.

20160302_180848

There’s Christina there, reading out her cards and looking radiant and teary-eyed, not realizing just how much we all love her and are willing to shower her with that love.

20160302_181447

This baby is going to be so spoiled and adored. There’s just no way around it. And no other person who deserves it more.