Summer of Baby Blankets, vol. 2 – Annie’s Levi Blanket

We’re on to the second blanket in our self-imposed Summer of Baby Blankets (make sure you go look back at vol. 1!), and it’s just such an astonishing piece of loveliness that I am surprised I made it.

20180707_094820

I mean, come on. If I didn’t spend so much time with it, watching Flashpoint and Endeavour while navigating its intensely cabled wonderland, I’d swear that I could never make such a thing.

20180707_094134

It’s almost like we should it Impostor Syndrome: the blanket.

20180530_172252

This blanket is going to my friend and co-worker Annie, who is expecting her first child in the next few weeks. She is, to me, someone who exudes a sort of class and grace about her that I can only aspire to, especially when I am concentrating very hard on not spilling something on myself or dropping something very breakable.

She’s lithe and blonde and will undoubtedly have the most beautiful and graceful daughter possible, so I figured she’d want to have something graceful and charming with family-heirloom potential. I clicked around for a long time on Ravelry, trying to find something that possessed those same characteristics. Something in lace or cables, for sure, but nothing that looked like it was an exercise in crazy celtic love-knots or impossibly difficult cabling. Just something classic and simple, but interesting and difficult enough to hold my attention.

20180529_165215

Enter Levi’s Baby Blanket by Lindsay Humphrey.  Three separate cable motifs, all symbolizing the unity between a baby and its parents.

Braids…

20180707_094237

…keyhole twists…

20180707_094245

…and a set of three heart motifs running up the center?

20180707_094219

Yes, please.

It’s got everything you could want in classic baby elegance, plus a cable chart that’ll knock you over sideways. It’s color-coded, for pete’s sake. Does it get any better?

20180707_094942

I went again with Cascade 220 Superwash Merino, this time in the color Tuffet (02), which is the most amazing cross somewhere between soft brown and gray. Like a really delicious mushroom. Or the color you’d expect Martha Stewart to have in every room of her house.

20180707_095019

When it was blocked, the merino relaxed into gorgeous silkiness, while still keeping perfect stitch definition for all of those twists and turns. I may have shoved my face into it for a second.

20180702_200001

And speaking of blocking, blocking wires are definitely your friend here. They are the perfect solution to making sure that every cable is stretched out perfectly both horizontally and vertically, and in getting those wavy blanket borders to lay flat. I got mine here, and have used them for almost every project since. They are a fantastic investment.

I did make a tiny bit of modification here from the original pattern, in order to make my yarn choice and desperate need for symmetry to work together.  The original pattern calls for a DK-weight yarn, and the Cascade 220 Merino is more of a light worsted, so things are going to be a little different height-wise. Also, I knitted the whole thing on size 6 needles, which may seem small, but really gets those cables to pop right in your face. To accommodate for this, I had to change the ending point of the pattern.

20180707_094448

The pattern calls for three repeats of the chart, then working up until row 56 on the 4th go-around. Because my yarn was larger, I found that I was at a really good length at three repeats, and then I just continued until row 9 so that my top and bottom cable twists on the 2nd cable motif were symmetrical. However, this made me go on to a fifth ball of yarn that I had to frantically special-order. If you’d like to make this pattern in the same yarn, you could probably just stop on the third chart repeat at row 73, then start your border from there. That way, you get your symmetry and you don’t have to scramble for that extra ball of yarn.

20180707_094748

Ugh, even the wrong side is pretty.

20180707_094203

Stay tuned for the exciting finale in the Summer of Baby Blankets, as soon as I finish it. Which might take a little bit. Hopefully we don’t bleed into the Early Fall of Baby Blankets, because it just doesn’t have the same ring to it.

Advertisements

Drachenschwingen is the greatest name for a pattern. Maybe ever.

Seriously, if you are knitting something called “Drachenschwingen,” all you want is for people to ask you what you are making so that you get to say “Drachenschwingen” as many times as possible.

20160325_085531

I don’t know why I didn’t end up taking German in high school, because German and German-sounding words are the most fun to say, especially when they are completely out of context. (Everyone remember extra strapazierfähig? How could we forget?)

20160325_090014

These awesome dragon-y socks first made an appearance on the blog waaaay back in July as my plane-knitting project as I made my way to Los Angeles to be super fancy, meet LeVar Burton, and go to the Emmys. I know, I know, but trust me, my life is not normally that exciting. Usually I am sitting on the couch knitting while watching Gilmore Girls and eating crackers.

20160204_143602

20160210_122501

Pictured: knitting and Gilmore Girls in the background (the episode in season 2 where Rory tries to win Dean back, btw). Not pictured: crackers, but trust me, they are there.

20160325_085502

Do your best and try not to fall in love with those awesome tiny finicky one-stitch cabled loops! You won’t be able to. All of Scarlet Plume‘s amazing sock patterns are stunning, and she’s definitely a huge fan of the twisted one-stitch cable. I think that she and Cookie A. would be fast friends.

20160325_085608

Part of the charm of knitting these socks lies in the sheer joy of using Pagewood Farm‘s Denali to make them. Every single skein of everything Pagewood Farm makes is so gorgeous that I have to take a breath and compose myself when I’m trying to make a decision. Denali in particular is a superwash merino and nylon blend that’s perfect for hard-wearing socks and making those tiny little twisted stitches pop.

20160325_085627

And the color! My knees get weak.

20160325_090043

From far away (and in the in-progress pictures taken in my extremely dark hobbit-hole living room), the colors in the Woodsey colorway blend together into a sort of greenish-olive-goldish-brown, but up close…little bits of blue, purple, white, emerald…heck, there’s even some little hints of pink in there. I can’t think of a better color to evoke the glittery iridescence of dragon scales. That is, if dragons were real, as we all wish they were.

20160325_085849

Quick side story:  Once at the B&N, a woman was browsing the kids’ science and nature section with a frown on her face for several minutes. I went up to her and asked her if she needed any help, and she told me that she couldn’t find any books on dragons. I directed her over to some picture books and the folklore and mythology section, and she looked at me like I was a crazy person and asked me why none of the books had any photographs of dragons. That was the day that I had to explain to a grown person that dragons weren’t real.

20160325_090006

Back to the socks. My very favorite part of the cable pattern on these socks is how the twisted stitches on the sides sort of “peel off” in layers to travel and form the loops in the center. Really beautiful stuff.

20160325_085550

There is one thing that threw me off a little bit about this pattern, and I’m not sure if it comes from a difference in pattern-writing conventions in different countries, but there’s a little bit of weirdness in the decreasing for the gusset area that might make things difficult for those new to knitting socks. Most patterns start the rows in the middle of the bottom of the foot, keeping the decreases together in one round. This pattern starts each round at the beginning of the cable-patterned top of the foot, giving each round a decrease rather than alternating plain and decrease rows. After I figured out what was going on, it totally made sense. However, if I came across something like that again, I’d probably rewrite the rows for the section, just to spare myself the mental gymnastics.

20160325_085915

That said, I am so excited to have finally finished these so that I can wear them around. I need to get myself a pair of those clear Chuck Taylors so that everyone can ask me about them. Then I’ll get to say “Drachenschwingen” over and over again and delight in these socks all over again.